TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper V7757 TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper V7757
TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper V7757 $99.99
TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper - The TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper Classics Never Go Out Of Style. - The TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper feature the new lightweight and more flexible soles in our traditional 1 7/8" height. - These round toe TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D - TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper feature the patented T.U.K. Skull n' Bones creeper sole design. Lower these TUK Black Suede Mondo Creeper with the Black Suede Low Sole Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew and became novel style along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper V6802 TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper V6802
TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper V6802 $99.99
TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper - TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper classics will never goes out of style! - These black leather TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper feature the new lightweight and more flexible soles in our traditional 1 7/8″ Mondo height. - These TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D-rings. - TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper feature 100% leather upper The TUK Black Leather Mondo Creeper are also in the tall Black Suede Mondo Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper V8463 TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper V8463
TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper V8463 $89.99
TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper - These TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper are round toed and feature our new lightweight and also more flexible VIVA Creeper sole. - These VEGAN TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper feature burgundy velvet throughout with black interlace binding. - This TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper also features silver metal d-rings for lacing up. - The TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper sole is nearly 2 inches high. Prefer black over the TUK Burgundy Velvet Mondo Creeper? Check out the Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper A9178 TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper A9178
TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper A9178 $69.99
TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper that reimagines the former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - Features one of the crowd-pleasing upper styles of black cow suede with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The VLK TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to our past creeper sneaker designs. - The vulcanized TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for. We've also got this TUK Black Suede Sneaker Creeper in a waxy Black Canvas Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK White Sneaker Creeper A9179 TUK White Sneaker Creeper A9179
TUK White Sneaker Creeper A9179 $69.99
TUK White Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK White Sneaker Creeper that reimagines our former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - This TUK White Sneaker Creeper features one of our popular upper styles of white leather with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The TUK White Sneaker Creeper collection features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to our past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the vulcanized TUK White Sneaker Creeper have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK TUK White Sneaker Creeper brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for. Check out the inverted version of this TUK White Sneaker Creeper, the Black Suede Creeper Sneaker w/White Interlace ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9181 TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9181
TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9181 $59.99
TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper that re-imagines our former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - The TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper features a vegan black twill upper & leopard faux fur with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. The fun animal print gives an extra dose of rock n' roll that looks great on guys & girls alike! - The VLK TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to our past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the vulcanized TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper brings to you everyday wear ability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for. If you love pink over the TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper, then you'll love the Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9483 TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9483
TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9483 $59.99
TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper that re-imagines our former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - Follow your instincts and run wild in these TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper. - Deliver an extra dose of fierceness in this TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper with a vegan friendly black twill upper combined with a fun pink faux leopard fur front. - The TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper features the vulcanized VLK creeper sneaker silhouette that lends everyday wearability. - D-ring lace up closure and the TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper has a lightly padded tongue along with removable memory foam insoles for added comfort. Check out these TUK Pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper with less pink Leopard Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper A9180 TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper A9180
TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper A9180 $69.99
TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper that reimagines former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper Features one of the bestselling upper styles of black & white leather with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The VLK TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the vulcanized TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK TUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for. Check out theTUK Black and White Sneaker Creeper in full White Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper A9182 TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper A9182
TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper A9182 $69.99
TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper that reimagines former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper features one of the most-loved upper styles of black cow suede with classic D-rings & iconic white interlace detailing along the front. - TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper collection features a more streamlined, sleeker look compared to past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition, the vulcanized TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper have insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a padded tongue for comfort. - VLK TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for. Want these TUK Black and White Suede Sneaker Creeper taller? Check out the Two-Tone Suede Creepers ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black White Check Mondo Creeper TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper V9536
TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper V9536 $99.99
TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper V9536 - Get ready to live life in the fast lane with the TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper! - This TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper features a black upper contrasted by a checkerboard pattern vamp and zipper trimming for an extra eye-catching touch. - Made of high quality TUKskin™ material — polishable synthetic faux leather that is both soft and breathable. - TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper Has lace-up fastening and our lightweight VIVA mondo sole that has a platform height approximately 1 ¾” at the heel and 1 ¼” in the front. - The TUK Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper includes removable memory foam padding for extra comfort.   If you like these Black and White Checkered TUK Creepers check out these A3017 TUK Pointed Creepers !   T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Pointed Creeper A9323 TUK Black Pointed Creeper A9323
TUK Black Pointed Creeper A9323 $99.99
TUK Black Pointed Creeper - Score a wardrobe win with these classic TUK Black Pointed Creeper that offers the same bold, iconic TUK style in a vegan alternative option. - Features an all-black upper made of our high quality TUKskin™ material — polishable synthetic faux leather that is both soft and breathable, making these TUK Black Pointed Creeper a great wear. - TUK Black Pointed Creeper lace-up fastening with a low sole platform that measures approximately 1 ¼” at the heel and ¾” in the front. - This TUK Black Pointed Creeper includes removable gel insoles for added comfort. - The TUK Black Pointed Creeper can be easily cleaned with mild soap and water. We also have the A9182 Sneaker Creeper TUK shoe collection ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper V9308 TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper V9492
TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper V9492 $89.99
TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper - The TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper are a luxe update and vegan friendly alternative to one of our bestselling classic creeper styles. - This TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper features a black velvet upper that sits on our lightweight VIVA low sole design. - TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper sole height is about 1 ½” at the heel and ¾” in the front. - Has removable gel insoles for added comfort, so these TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper will be one of the most comfortable shoes. If you love the leather feel over the velvet on the TUK Black Velvet Low Sole Creeper, check out the Leather Low Sole Creepers ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper V8366 TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper V8366
TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper V8366 $99.99
TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper - These TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper have contrasting white interlace. - This TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper features the new lightweight and more flexible soles in our traditional 1 7/8" Mondo height. - These TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper have a white woven interlace, and silver metal D-rings. - With a padded insole for comfort, the TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper will feel comfortable with every step. If you'd like purple on the TUK Two Tone Suede Mondo Creeper, check out these TUK Vegan Brogue Mary Janes ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper A9528 TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper A9528
TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper A9528 $69.99
TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper - These TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper are ultimate every day and go-with-everything sneaker to hit the road for all of your adventures in style. - This TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper features a cool gray cow suede upper with our classic interlace detail and D-rings. - These Vulcanized TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper gives a sleek, lightweight, streamlined design compared to our traditional high sole creepers. - TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper has a lightly padded tongue along with removable memory foam insoles for added comfort. We've also got these TUK Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper dark Red Suede Creeper Sneakers ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper A9529 TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper A9529
TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper A9529 $69.99
TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper - The ultimate every day and go-with-everything sneaker to hit the road for all of your adventures in style is the TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper. - TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper features a rich dark red suede upper with our classic interlace detail and D-rings. - The Vulcanized TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper collection gives a sleek, lightweight, streamlined design compared to our traditional high sole creepers. - TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper has a lightly padded tongue along with removable memory foam insoles for added comfort. The Gray Suede Sneaker Creepers are just as fashionable as the TUK Red Suede Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Burgundy Suede Pointed Creeper A9592 TUK Burgundy Suede Pointed Creeper A9592
TUK Burgundy Suede Pointed Creeper A9592 $99.99
TUK Burgundy Suede Pointed Creeper - Crazy about hue. Give your shoe game the perfect dose of color with these sleek TUK Burgundy Suede Pointed Creeper - Features a black cow suede upper complemented by a rich, dark red vamp. - The TUK Burgundy Suede Pointed Creeper sits on top of a low sole creeper platform that measures 1 ¼” at the heel and ¾” in the front and has a monk buckle strap closure. - Includes removable memory foam insoles for added comfort. If you love leather, check out the Western Buckle Pointed Creeper ! T.U.K. History Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time. The Teddy Boys were the originators for the Mod culture of the ‘60s. Anywhere you were, if you looked down at a Teds feet, you’ll be sure to see the classic creeper. Through the ‘60s and ‘70s the rise of Rock n’Roll took place, and until the great rise of punk came around in the ’80s did the creeper style find its place as its continued to spread its culture throughout the decades.
TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper V9564 TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper V9564
TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper V9564 $89.99
TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper - Show the world your unique sense of style with these classic round toe TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper that offers the same bold, iconic style in a vegan alternative option. - This TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper has a black upper contrasted with pastel pink on the vamp made of our high quality TUKskin™ material — polishable synthetic faux leather that is both soft and breathable. - TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper features black woven interlace detailing, lace-up fastening, and our lightweight VIVA mondo sole that is approximately 1 ¾” at the heel and 1 ¼” in the front. - TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper features removable memory foam padding for added comfort. In contrast to these TUK Black and Pink Mondo Creeper, we have vegan Black and White Checkered Creepers as well ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Creeper Buckle V8356
TUK Black Creeper Buckle V8356 $99.99
TUK Black Creeper Buckle - Classic Buckle Action Leather TUK Black Creeper Buckle will be your wardrobe staple. - TUK Black Creeper Buckle features T.U.K.'s lightweight, flexible EVA and rubber sole, monkstrap buckle design, and cushioned insole for added comfort. - These TUK Black Creeper Buckle shoes are comfortable and fashionable. - Wear the TUK Black Creeper Buckle shoes to heighten your attitude ! Don't like the TUK Black Creeper Buckle, check out the vegan Black Mondo Boots ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990for mens and womens footwear. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9681 TUK Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9681
TUK Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9681 $99.99
TUK Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper - The timeless TUK creeper that you know and love is back featuring a new sleeker sole that is more lightweight and flexible than ever with the Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper. - Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper has a black upper with a white front made of our high quality TUKskin material- polishable synthetic faux leather that is both soft and breathable. - Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper features a low platform height that is approximately 1 1/4” at the heel and 3/4” in the front and is made of a mixture of EVA and rubber that contributes to the sole’s bendability. - The TUK Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper feature a removable memory foam padding for comfort. These Black and White Vegan Low Sole Creeper are available in a Black White Checkered Mondo Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.'s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name 'brothel creeper' during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh's dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called "The Creep." Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the '60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren't riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9537 TUK Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9537
TUK Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9537 from $99.99
TUK Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper - The timeless TUK creeper that you know and love is back featuring a new sleeker sole that is more lightweight and flexible than ever with the Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper. - Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper has a black upper with a white front made of our high quality TUKskin material- polishable synthetic faux leather that is both soft and breathable. - Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper features a low platform height that is approximately 1 1/4” at the heel and 3/4” in the front and is made of a mixture of EVA and rubber that contributes to the sole’s bendability. - The Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper feature a removable memory foam padding for comfort. Soften these Burgundy Vegan Low Sole Creeper with the Velvet Burgundy Mondo Creepers ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.'s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name 'brothel creeper' during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh's dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called "The Creep." Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the '60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren't riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9680 TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9680
TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper F9680 $99.99
TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper - The timeless TUK creeper that you know and love is back featuring a new sleeker sole that is more lightweight and flexible than ever with the Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper. - These TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creepers has a black upper with a white front made of our high quality TUKskin material- polishable synthetic faux leather that is both soft and breathable. - The TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper also features a low platform height that is approximately 1 1/4” at the heel and 3/4” in the front and is made of a mixture of EVA and rubber that contributes to the sole’s bendability. - This TUK Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper a removable memory foam padding for comfort. Soften these Gray Vegan Low Sole Creeper with the Gray Suede Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.'s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name 'brothel creeper' during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh's dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called "The Creep." Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the '60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren't riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9690 TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9690
TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9690 $59.99
TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Leopard Sneaker Creeper that re-imagines our former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - Follow your instincts and run wild in these TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper. - Deliver an extra dose of fierceness in this TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper with a vegan friendly black twill upper combined with a fun pink faux leopard fur front. - The TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper features the vulcanized VLK creeper sneaker silhouette that lends everyday wearability. - D-ring lace up closure and the TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper has a lightly padded tongue along with removable memory foam insoles for added comfort. Check out these TUK Purple Leopard Sneaker Creeper with less colored Leopard Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper V9763
TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper V9763 $99.99
TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper - The TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper Classics Never Go Out Of Style. - The TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper feature the new lightweight and more flexible soles in our traditional 1 7/8" height. - These round toe TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D - TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper feature the patented T.U.K. Skull n' Bones creeper sole design. Lower these TUK Charcoal Suede Mondo Creeper with the Gray Suede Low Sole Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper TUK Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper D9765
TUK Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper D9765 $99.99
TUK Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper - This is T.U.K.'s premium Creeper collection. We have delved into the brands rich heritage to produce The 1970 Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper. - Taking these Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper back to an iconic era when Punk Rock was the sound of a rebellious and political youth movement and The Creeper became a symbol of sub culture and anti-establishment. - Just like back in the day, the Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper features 'proper leather and suede' uppers, luxury leather linings and natural rubber soles with a patterned welt. - This pair of 1970 Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper has a classic Monk Buckle strap closure. If you liked these Black Suede Pointed Original Creeper, check out the Black Pointed Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. As we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Suede Pointed Creeper A8139 TUK Black Suede Pointed Creeper A8139
TUK Black Suede Pointed Creeper A8139 $99.99
TUK Black Suede Pointed Creeper A8139 - The latest creation and a new favorite on this TUK Black Suede Pointed Creeper is the black leather monk buckle – perfect for dressing up or dressing down! - Taking these Black Suede Pointed Creeper back to an iconic era when Punk Rock was the sound of a rebellious and political youth movement and The Creeper became a symbol of subculture and anti-establishment. - Just like back in the day, the Black Suede Pointed Creeper features 'proper leather and suede uppers, luxury leather linings, and natural rubber soles with a patterned welt. - Black leather throughout and black stitch detailing, this Black Suede Pointed Creeper sole measures approximately 1.25 inches. If you liked these Black Suede Pointed Creeper, check out the Black Pointed Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. As we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Leather Low Creeper TUK Black Leather Low Creeper F6806
TUK Black Leather Low Creeper F6806 $99.99
TUK Black Leather Low Creeper - TUK Black Leather Low Creeper classics will never goes out of style! - These black leather TUK Black Leather Low Creeper feature the new lightweight and more flexible soles in our traditional 1 ¼” at the heel and ¾” in the front - These TUK Black Leather Low Creeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D-rings. - TUK Black Leather Low Creeper feature 100% leather upper The TUK Black Leather Low Creeper are also in the tall Black Suede Low Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and also worn by Bananarama. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Suede Low Creeper F7270 TUK Black Suede Low Creeper F7270
TUK Black Suede Low Creeper F7270 $99.99
TUK Black Suede Low Creeper - The TUK Black Suede Low Creeper Classics Never Go Out Of Style. - The TUK Black Suede Low Creeper features the new lightweight low platform height that is approximately 1 ¼” at the heel and ¾” in the front. - These round toe TUK Black Suede Low Creeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D-rings. - TUK Black Suede Low Creeper features the patented T.U.K. Skull n' Bones creeper sole design. Lower these TUK Black Suede Low Creeper with the Black Leather Low Sole Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and also worn by Bananarama Now more than ever before, outsider and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Leather Pointed Creeper A8520 TUK Black Leather Pointed Creeper A8520
TUK Black Leather Pointed Creeper A8520 $99.99
TUK Black Leather Pointed Creeper A8520 - The latest creation and a new favorite on this TUK Black Leather Pointed Creeper is the black leather monk buckle – perfect for dressing up or dressing down! - Taking these Black Leather Pointed Creeper back to an iconic era when Punk Rock was the sound of a rebellious and political youth movement and The Creeper became a symbol of subculture and anti-establishment. - Just like back in the day, the Black Leather Pointed Creeper features 'proper leather and suede uppers, luxury leather linings, and natural rubber soles with a patterned welt. - Black leather throughout and black stitch detailing, this Black Leather Pointed Creeper sole measures approximately 1.25 inches. If you liked these Black Leather Pointed Creeper, check out the Black Pointed Creeper A9323! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. As we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper
TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper S9789 $99.99
TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper - Shoes to stomp on hearts with. These TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper bad boys’ have an all-black suede upper that sits on our lightweight VIVA stratocreeper sole that has a platform height approximately 3” at the heel and 2.5” in the front. - TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper Includes removable memory foam padding for extra comfort and inside zipper closure for easy on/off. - These round toe TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D-rings. - TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper features the patented T.U.K. Skull n' Bones creeper sole design. Lower these TUK Black Suede Stratocreeper with the Black Leather Low Sole Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, punk. Now more than ever before, outsider and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper S9680 TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper S9860
TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper S9860 $99.99
TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper S9860 - Shoes to stomp on hearts with. These TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper bad boys’ have an all-black suede upper that sits on our lightweight VIVA tuk black velvet stratocreeper sole that has a platform height approximately 3” at the heel and 2.5” in the front. - TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper Includes removable memory foam padding for extra comfort and inside zipper closure for easy on/off. - These round toe TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper have a black woven interlace, and silver metal D-rings. - TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper features the patented T.U.K. Skull n' Bones creeper sole design.   Lower these TUK Black Velvet Stratocreeper with the Black Suede Low Creeper    T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, punk. Now more than ever before, outsider and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black Sneaker Creeper A9873 TUK Black Sneaker Creeper A9873
TUK Black Sneaker Creeper A9873 $69.99
TUK Black Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized TUK Black Sneaker Creeper that reimagines former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - TUK Black Sneaker Creeper Features one of the bestselling upper styles of black leather with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The VLK TUK Black Sneaker Creeper features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the vulcanized TUK Black Sneaker Creeper have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK TUK Black Sneaker Creeper brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for. Check out theTUK Black Sneaker Creeper in full White Sneaker Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. Demand sudden began to grow, and soon T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. Teds wore even bulkier, draped jackets, and high-wasted trousers. They often wore their collars loose and often styled up their outfits with very flamboyant detailing like Bolo Ties and velvet trim. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed wearing them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the hair style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine, slickly polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. And as we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived in the ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. The creeper shoe has since then been adopted by subcultures like indie, ska, punk, new wavers, psychobilly, rockabilly, greasers and goth, Japanese Visual Kei, and was also worn by Bananarama, and the singer of Republica Saffron. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
TUK Black T-Strap Mary Jane Creeper TUK Black T-Strap Mary Jane Creeper
TUK Black T-Strap Mary Jane Creeper F9954 $89.99
TUK Black T-Strap Mary Jane Creeper - Make every step count in these Black Faux Suede T-strap Mary Jane Creepers. - The Black Faux Suede T-strap Mary Jane Creepers feature the new, sleeker Viva II sole that is more lightweight and flexible than ever. - They have a low platform height that is approximately 1.25” at the heel and .75” in the front and is made of a mixture of EVA and rubber that contributes to the sole’s bendability. - This TUK Black T-Strap Mary Jane Creeper omes with removable memory foam insoles for added comfort.
TUK Black White Leather Pointed Creeper A3017 TUK Black White Leather Pointed Creeper A3017
TUK Black White Leather Pointed Creeper A3017 $99.99
TUK Black White Leather Pointed Creeper A3017 - The latest creation and a new favorite on this TUK Black White Leather Pointed Creeper is the black leather monk buckle – perfect for dressing up or dressing down! - Taking these Black White Leather Pointed Creeper back to an iconic era when Punk Rock was the sound of a rebellious and political youth movement and The Creeper became a symbol of subculture and anti-establishment. - Just like back in the day, the Black White Leather Pointed Creeper features 'proper leather and suede uppers, luxury leather linings, and natural rubber soles with a patterned welt. - Black leather throughout and black stitch detailing, this Black White Leather Pointed Creeper sole measures approximately 1.25 inches. If you liked these Black White Leather Pointed Creeper, check out the Black Pointed Creeper ! T.U.K./Creeper History Originally from Northampton, England, T.U.K. has moved to the sandy shores of San Diego, CA since 1990. English footwear since the 1890s, brought the distinctly British aspects of the shoe and found the greatest inspiration and influence in the ever growing Southern California punk rock scene. The main result was: a one-of-a-kind distinctive brand of footwear that fosters punk roots across the entire world. T.U.K.’s first retail store was opened in 1991, selling their very own shoes in-house. T.U.K. was selling its products worldwide. T.U.K. fabricates a variety of footwear from women’s high heels to unisex sneakers, but the most popular design is, without a doubt, the creeper platform design. Made from crepe rubber during WWII, the thick creeper-sole helped soldiers in the deserts of North African across the hot and sandy terrain. John Ayto claims to have labeled the name ‘brothel creeper’ during those wartime years. The Smithsonian Museum suggests that the crepe in the thick sole might have provided the creeper name towards the shoe. It can also possibly be associated with Ken Mackintosh’s dance tune which had great popularity in 1953 called “The Creep.” Like fashion does, it followed the foot steps of these soldiers and the thick soles began to catch on in England. In London, the decades following the war gave way to a kaleidoscopic cultural underground with subcultures exploding with a variety of styles during the time.Influenced by the Edwardian dressing manner of the Dandies, the Teddy Boy style grew along with the introduction of American rock n’ roll music. The creeper shoe was also well worn by the Ton-Up boys from the 1950s and later on by the rockers of the ’60s, who enjoyed them as an alternative shoe when they weren’t riding their motorbikes. Greased hair was the style of preference. And if you looked down and your feet at any moment, you’d be sure to see the Teds boasting their fine polished oxfords, or the crepe-soled classic, platformed creepers. As we know, through the ‘60s and ‘70s was the rise of the Rockers and the Mods, who took hold their liking in classic Teddy Boy-centric garb ebbed and flowed, and it wasn’t until the great rise of punk around the mid ‘70s when the creeper was once again seen on the feet of many, an uproar that surged well into the ‘80s, thrived ‘90s, and eventually exploded with the great expansion of the world-wide web. Now more than ever before, outsider styles and subcultures hold the style inspired around the whole world, and with its historical background that is deeply woven in the English style and at the West Coast punk way of living, T.U.K. is able to perfectly represent and illustrate the culture clash/expansion of the past few decades.
Black & Tan Leopard Sneaker Creeper TUK Black & Tan Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9946
TUK Black & Tan Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9946 $69.99
Black & Tan Leopard Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized sneakers that reimagines T.U.K.'s former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - Features one of T.U.K.'s crowd-pleasing upper styles in a tan leopard hair with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The VLK collection features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to our past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the vulcanized sneakers have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for.
Black & Burgundy Leopard Sneaker Creeper TUK Black & Burgundy Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9947
TUK Black & Burgundy Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9947 $69.99
Black & Burgundy Leopard Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized sneakers that reimagines our former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - Features one of our crowd-pleasing upper styles in a burgundy leopard hair with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The VLK collection features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to our past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the Black & Burgundy Leopard Sneaker Creeper have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for.
TUK Black & Grey Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9948 TUK Black & Grey Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9948
TUK Black & Grey Leopard Sneaker Creeper A9948 $69.99
Black & Grey Leopard Sneaker Creeper - Normal is boring! Get ready to hit the stage or the streets in these vulcanized sneakers that reimagines T.U.K.'s former creeper sneaker silhouette with bold & modern twists. - Features one of T.U.K.'s crowd-pleasing upper styles in a grey leopard hair with classic D-rings & iconic interlace detailing along the front. - The VLK collection features a more streamlined and sleeker look compared to our past creeper sneaker designs. - In addition to its' updated form, the vulcanized sneakers have removable insoles with a 3mm layer of memory foam and a lightly padded tongue for added comfort. - VLK brings to you everyday wearability with a clean style while incorporating the edge & originality that T.U.K. is known for.

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